Pre-War Style

  • Entryway in a New York City penthouse.

    Neutral and ultimately chic, the entryway is decorated with stunning marble tile flooring and simple wall hangings.   See the Image

  • Living room in a New York City apartment.

    The corner sitting room is adorned with coffered ceilings and a stunning fireplace.   See the Image

  • Contemporary kitchen in a New York City apartment.

    This magnificent penthouse has a lot going for it: gorgeous prewar details, grand-scale rooms and a great location on Fifth Avenue. The chef's kitchen is dramatically lit by soaring skylights.   See the Image

  • Dining room in a New York City apartment.

    Stunning murals give the classic dining room an artistic touch.   See the Image

  • The homes built in the pre-war era were embellished with special touches -- high ceilings, arched doorways and nickel-plated features.

    See examples of the pre-war architectural style and famous pre-war landmarks.   See the Gallery

  • The San Remo is a 27-floor luxury co-operative apartment building in New York City located between 74th and 75th streets in Central Park West. It has been home to many notable people, including…   See the Image

  • This beautiful pre-war building was constructed in 1910 and still remains a highly desired property in the heart of Manhattan.

    This beautiful pre-war building was constructed in 1910 and still remains a highly desired property in the heart of Manhattan. Key elements of the building include hardwood flooring, high…   See the Image

  • Built in 1888, this pre-war building is located in the Gold Coast area of Chicago.

    Built in 1888, this pre-war building is located in the Gold Coast area of Chicago, where many homes of this architectural style can be seen. With exterior ornamentation around the windows and…   See the Image

  • Typically, a pre-war ceiling will be 9 feet above the ground, and sometimes higher.

    Homeowners, back then and today, don't like feeling closed in. Typically, a ceiling will be 9 feet above the ground, and sometimes higher. In many ways this is a holdover from the Victorian…   See the Image