• Lawn Revolution: Contrasting Textures

    The grass clumps are Muhlenbergia Rigens, surrounded by wood mulch, next to a path made of decomposed granite, which complements the dormant grass in color.    See the Image

  • Lawn Revolution: Meadow Soprano

    On the East Coast, there's the prairie movement; here in Northern California, a similar return to naturally occurring meadows would mean more environmental stability.    See the Image

  • Lawn Revolution: Emerald Waves of Grain

    When Carex Pansa gets long enough, it lays down gently to create wave-like forms. Wildflowers such as Cistus Purpureus are a gentle yet spectacular complement.    See the Image

  • Lawn Revolution: Two Kinds of Grass

    At left, Festuca Rubra, which stays green. At right, Nasella Pulchrum, which goes dormant in the summer.    See the Image

  • Lawn Revolution: A Farewell to Uniformity

    The traditional lawn is, essentially, green pavement: It might make for a good croquet field, but when was the last time you played croquet?    See the Image

  • Lawn Revolution: A Beautiful Compromise

    This lawn has the traditional Dwarf Tall Fescue lawn to the right — but only one patch of it. The rest is Iris Douglasiana (foreground) and Festuca Californica (rear), with stones and mulch for…   See the Image

  • Lawn Revolution: Wildflowers in Bloom

    Salvia Clevelandii is a common flowering shrub that blooms all summer. (This isn't the kind Miley Cyrus smoked.)    See the Image

  • Lawn Revolution: Cat Not Included

    The grass here is Festuca idahoensis, with lavandula vera (not in bloom — it's a fuzzy purple stalk of a flower) and a gravel path.   See the Image

  • Lawn Revolution: Strange Flowerbed-Fellows

    Festuca rubra grass with the wildflower Erigeron glauca, also known as the seaside daisy.    See the Image

  • Lawn Revolution: Native Pride

    The state flower, California Poppy, with Salvia clevelandii in bloom.    See the Image